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Week 7

Let's use our retrieval skills!

 

Do you remember Rex the Retriever from our Reading lessons?

 

He helped us to find information by looking for clues in the text.

 

Follow this link to the Year 2 lessons on the Oak National Academy website:

https://www.thenational.academy/online-classroom/year-2/english#subjects

 

Complete Lesson 1 and Lesson 2 to revisit these skills. The text is 'The Firework Makers Daughter' by Philip Pullman.

 

 

Instructions - a revisit!

 

Following on with 'The Firework Maker's Daughter' complete Lessons 3, 4 an 5 to revisit what you have already learned about instructions.

 

https://www.thenational.academy/online-classroom/year-2/english#subjects

 

Remember!

  •  Adverbs usually end in -ly.
  •  Adverbs describe verbs (dong words)

 

    e.g.

           Put that box down.

           The verb is 'put'. It is what I am telling you to 'do'.

 

           Now I'm going to add an adverb.

 

           Put that box down carefully.

           The adverb is 'carefully' this is 'how' I want you to put the box down.

A little bit of art ...

I know that some of you have been looking out for buttercups while you've been going out for exercise and I promised one or two of you that I would keep my eyes open too.

 

Last week, one of my walks, I spotted these. 

Aren't they pretty?

 

  •  Using your excellent art skills, can you create a detailed picture of them?

        You might choose to draw them or paint them or maybe you could use materials to create a 3-D buttercup.

 

  •  Could you create a piece of art based on a flower or plant in your garden?

 

Haiku Poetry

Last week we took a look at limericks - I know that some of you really enjoyed these nonsense rhymes.

 

This week, these beautiful flowers (the buttercups above) and some of the beautiful pink apple blossom that I've spotted in people's gardens, has put me in mind of a special type of poem from Japan - the haiku.

 

A haiku poem doesn't usually rhyme.

 

A haiku has only three lines.

 

The first line has five syllables, the second has seven and the final line has five again.

 

This example is called 'The Old Pond' and was written by Matsuo Basho - a Japanese grand master of haiku.

 

An old silent pond,

A frog jumps into the pond -

SPLASH! Silence again.

 

Here is my haiku about the buttercups:

Tiny and golden,

Gathered together in grass,

Smiling at the sun.

 

  • Now it's your turn!

       I can't wait to read them!

 

 

 

Position, Direction, Rotation (Maths)

 

Take a look at Lesson 8, Lesson 9 and Lesson 10 on the Oak Academy website.

 

https://www.thenational.academy/online-classroom/year-2/maths#subjects

 

  •  Crete a poster about what you've learned to help you remember.
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